Author Topic: Being a paranormal investigator  (Read 2117 times)

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Offline SteveM

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Being a paranormal investigator
« on: July 24, 2014, 01:10:31 PM »
Hi,

I am a lead investigator for a local group. All of this groups members were a part of a larger group that was rather well known in the UK, but due to circumstances things changed so we set up on our own.

Being an investigator is a mind opener in itself.
You get to meet many different people, have some amazing conversations and visit fascinating places.

But it's not all fun and games and neither is it a guaranteed 'fright night'!

You are a profesional. You represent your team and all of the other groups out there and messing around creating 'bumps in the night' is highly frowned upon.

It's a bit like fishing. You might not get a bite for hours upon hours, but the next night you cannot stop realing new catches in...
Luck of the draw..

It's also tiring as you are up most of the night and may have traveled a fair distance. Then there is the cost of going to places and the equipment can set you back a fair bit too.

The rewards for all your efforts can be priceless. The memories will always be with you, but the evidence you capture will haunt you whilst you try to make sense of it all.
Yes it can be fun... lots of fun.. as you can see in this video (I am the cameraman and PLEASE be WARNED this does contain some bad language due to the situation) This was captured at the Kelvedon nuclear bunker http://www.secretnuclearbunker.com/
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lL92jSDNJiY[/youtube]
All she could see was my face lit up by the camera screen...

Then you get things that happen that you just simply cannot plan..
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwCA1hgvesE[/youtube]

Then you get the serious side of things, the things you search for. They can be surprising, incredible, amazing and, if they're anything like this one, gut wrenching and heart breaking.
Listen carefully (ignore the first three seconds of chatter, that is coming from another part of the building) from 4 seconds to 7 seconds.. You will hear a young girl talking.
Can you work out what she says? If not, i will post her words further down so as to let you try to work it out first..
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDAB-EmfyC8[/youtube]
I was sat completely alone when I captured that girl..

The worst part of doing all this is the hours of sitting and watching your video and listening to all your recordings for the slightest movement, the quietest word whispered or spotting the darkest of shadows in the corner of your monitor.. But this pays off when you realize you've got great captures like the above..

Happy hunting!!


























Dad  I miss you... I miss daddy...
« Last Edit: July 24, 2014, 01:13:58 PM by SteveM »

Offline Ulatek

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Re: Being a paranormal investigator
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2014, 02:05:00 PM »
Nice, especially the last video.

I am curious, do you use strictly the older cassette type recorders or modern audio equipment? Also have you ever tried gathering EVP in a setting where there is no calims of the paranormal?

Offline SteveM

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Re: Being a paranormal investigator
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2014, 02:44:49 PM »
It's the norm these days to use the digital variety.

If you did decide to use the old casette type then you will have to also get the equipment with which to transfer it to a digital format for file sharing and any other form of analysis.

I currently only use a full spectrum video camera which, luckily, has a rather nice habbit of picking up EVP's.

Yes, I have tried to collect evidence in places where there have been no reports of hauntings, but the results are still an open door.
Reason being, the 'spirits' have no boundaries, there are no walls.
What is, or was, normal for them is now completely different in our current realm.
There is nothing that provides us with information as to what they experience or see as they walk amongst us. For all we know, we could be the ones that they see as ghosts.. It's all down to the observers perspective and/or dimensional overlap which would include the 'spirit world'.

There is a guy who uses a modified radio to get immediate, real time responses from the spirits. He does this in his own home and appears to be attracting more attention from the spirits.
This is him...
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TO0lVYywfPE[/youtube]

So, yes, it is highly possible to get results from places that have never seen activity. I think it might be to do with intent and our spiritual connection which draws in a crowd. We are energy, and our will, dreams and desires ripple through the fabric of our perceivable existance.

Offline Ulatek

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Re: Being a paranormal investigator
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2014, 11:14:36 PM »
in 2010-11 i tried gathering EVP in various settings, about half of which were in just random places. with a cheap digital recorder.

unbelievable how much I was getting, in many of them a high pitched, clearly audible jabbering was present throughout the entire recording.

those disturbed me to the point that i couldnt listen to them completely and have since deleted them all.

i am thinking i will try to gather more in the next few weeks, and see if they still come out that way.

at the time i was not wanting to hear what i was hearing and gave in to denial, though i regret deleting them now.

have you ever considered using a modified microphone with a program like signal-lab to pick up frequencies outside the range of human hearing?

i mean normal microphones will do this already to a degree anyway, but for sound quality purposes many have filtering circuits etc. to narrow down the spectrum.

Offline SteveM

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Re: Being a paranormal investigator
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2014, 09:23:28 AM »
It would be nice to have some serious equipment and software with which to capture and study, but funds are few and far between :)

I try to keep everything I collect.. you never know what might turn up in the future.. Reminds me  of a photo I once took of an object in the sky, I have the photo and one of the images from the study carried out on it, but the negative is missing.. I'm sure I put it in a safe place... so safe that I cannot put my hands on it..

Will do a post on that soon so you can see it..


Offline Ulatek

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Re: Being a paranormal investigator
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2014, 05:22:24 AM »
Really I think you would be surprised at just how little if anything in the way of funds it would actually set you back.

with free software (spectrum lab) and a $4 electret microphone element wired into the mic port of a soundcard with a sample rate of lets say 192.khz you could extend the range of the frequencies you actually record up to 90hz from the typical 20hz of your typical voice recorders that are heavily filtered.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2014, 06:17:34 AM by Ulatek »